Buffalo's Favorite Parks and Recreation

Urban Value

As early as the 1850’s, Olmsted justified the purchase of land for New York City’s Central Park by noting that the rising value of adjacent properties would produce enough new tax revenue to pay for the investment. By 1864, Olmsted documented a net return of $55,880 in additional annual tax revenues. Just think of the potential economic development opportunities for Western New York with a revitalized Buffalo Olmsted Park System!

As recent studies at Yale University have found, urban nature areas have proven to reduce societal stress, moderate temperatures, purify air, prevent soil erosion and protect water sources. This is in addition to neighborhood connection, improved quality of life and increased property values for park community residents.

Today, cities across America are discovering what Buffalo knew a century ago – quality urban parks and greenways are vital to a city’s quality of life and to its economic success. The Buffalo Olmsted Park System creates a unique urban landscape that integrates the city, providing common ground and connectivity among the neighborhoods.

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